Couplets Episode 10: Catriona Wright and… Me!

Do you like poetry? Do you like experimentation? Do you like Thursday evenings of art and writing and literary surprises? Come see me and Catriona Wright give a collaborative hour-long performance on June 29 from 6-7 pm at The ARTS Project in London. For more details, follow the links below!

Also, did I mention it’s free admission?

https://coupletsreadingseries.wordpress.com/2017/05/27/episode-10-catriona-wright-erica-mckeen/

https://www.facebook.com/events/427829680923669/

New Writing, New Reading…

Finally! My creative writing has once again entered the public sphere!

The lovely literary journal, Persephone’s Daughtersfor which I am a reader, published one of my short stories today. It is called “Married Life,” and it delves into the psychological and emotional confusions of rape culture, submission, and a society entrenched in manners. The writing style differs from a lot of my other works: it is abrupt and purposefully artificial, verging on metafiction.

Have a read, tell me what you think, and feel free to check out the other amazing pieces in this issue. The journal focuses on all areas and ideas surrounding the abuse of women — it is stories of survival through art.

I think it goes without saying that communication and understanding regarding these issues are unutterably important to me.

Read my story and others like it here.

While Meditating on the Concept of a Story…

“Some moral tales belong to kindergarten, the age of being afraid of the dark, the age of venturing from the house alone for a short distance, admonitory fables in primary crayons. But other tales are always with us. We tell them to ourselves in midlife and in old age, different each time, accreting as stalactites press toward earth, heavier with each drop and its burden of secret dissolved rock and minerals, the many salts of the planet.”

— Marge Piercy, He, She, and It

Reason #32 to Keep Living: Being an Artist, Being a Woman

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I have recently embarked on the journey of being a prose reader for a literary magazine that focuses on the stories and sufferings of abused women. I at first thought (to my genuine embarrassment) that this was a paid position. On learning that it was not, and that in fact no one working for this magazine is paid, I was at first upset, and then angry, and then grateful. Continue reading

Reason #30 to Keep Living: Fight, Faith, and Feminism

dsc01909Sandra M. Gilbert and Susan Gubar’s book of Feminist Literary Theory and Criticism is one of those books I will never abandon, no matter how full my bookshelf becomes. I bought this book for a literary feminist class I never ended up completing, but it continues to be invaluable “light” reading when I’m not in the mood to open a novel. It pertains specifically to me because many of the essays delve into the topic of Woman as Writer.  Continue reading

“Perhaps, also, you will come to believe that real life is more singular and more fantastic than anything else and that all a writer can really do is present it as “in a glass, darkly.”

— E. T. A. Hoffmann, “The Sandman”